Road Resources

Roadschool Moms Top 10 Summer Destinations

  • Jul 6, 2015

No matter what your U.S. location, summer is in full swing with long days and starry nights. The Roadschool Moms team hit the pause button on their summer travel to reflect on their top ten favorite destinations in the country visited in their RV. The July 5th epsiode of Roadschool Moms, now in it’s fourth season, breaks down the highlights of each destination, where they stayed with their families in each location, and the educational opportunities that were found along the way. Here’s a short summary of the Roadschool Moms Top 10 Summer Destinations (in no particular order):

 

  1. Bar Harbor MEBar Harbor, ME  This coastal town is located at the base of Cadillac Mountain and neighboring Acadia National Park. As one of the premiere North American destinations dating back to the 19th century, this area once included a Millionaire’s Row of summer estates belonging to some of the most powerful families in the history of this country. The resources that grew from that network of the rich and famous, are still apparent today in the way of museums, shoppes, and historical points of interest. The nature scene is overflowing with sport opportunities while the discovery of the beautiful surroundings is an event in itself. For more information about Bar Harbor, go to visitmaine.com.
  2. Cody WYCody, WY  The natural beauty of Cody, WY, is like no other place on earth. This old west town has all the charm of yesteryear while entertaining all ages of today’s traveler.  Home to Buffalo Bill, this area has a multitude of things to see including rodeos, museums, out-west activities, scenic byways, wildlife galore, and all the adventure of the great outdoors. All the details for what to see in Cody, WY can be found at yellowstonecountry.org.
  3. lancasterLancaster, PA  Pennsylvania’s Dutch Country offers a wide variety of fun things to see and do in Lancaster County for all ages. Theater productions, tours, museums, amusement parks, covered bridges, and Amish activities are all on the list of favorites from previous visitors. Much of this area moves at a slower pace and centers around traditions from a different time period. Amidst the peaceful scenery in Lancaster, a unique blend of attractions, history, and opportunity to explore exists. Visit lancasterpa.com to begin the journey to a change of pace.
  4. assateague islandAssateague Island, VA  The seashore of Assateague Island reaches 37 miles of pristine, white sandy beach and is considered one of the best beach destinations on the East Coast. Bird watching, kayaking, crabbing, fishing, and the many other outdoor activities are the daily routine of visitors to this area.  The wild ponies of Assateague Island travel the beach near Chincoteague, Virginia & Ocean City, Maryland offering a grand history lesson in itself. More facts about beautiful Assateague Island, VA can be found at assateagueisland.com.
  5. seasideSeaside, OR  If the Oregon coast is on your radar for the summer, make plans to stay in Seaside for bonfires on the beach, beautiful summer sunsets, and more things to do than will fit on your travel calendar. While the beach if the place to play, there are so many other sights to take in such as feeding the seals and wildlife watching. Making a day of it can include exploring the galleries, festivals, coastal lighthouses, historical landmarks, and the many sports made available by Mother Nature. Stop by visittheoregoncoast.com for the scoop on Seaside, OR.
  6. montrose coMontrose, CO  Exploring the Black Canyon and the natural wonder of the Gunnison River is the center of this charming Colorado attraction. Local art and culture are also a treat while the thrill of nature is abundant with fishing, rafting, rock climbing and the breathtaking beauty of the area.  Adventure for all ages can be found easily at coloradoinfo.com.
  7. UP MIMichigan Upper Peninsula  There are four beautiful seasons to enjoy the breathtaking scenery in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula; however, summer can’t be beat in this area packed full of fun. If outdoor sports on the list of important area amenities, then look no further. Biking, boating, birding, hiking, golfing, and fishing can be enjoyed from sun up until sun down. The UP offers famous lighthouses, museums, historic sights, and even America’s first national seashore. If a trip to Upper Michigan in is sight, keep the calendar open because there is much to enjoy. Check out uptravel.com for more details.
  8. Lake ThiefHorse Thief Lake, SD  In the shadows of Mount Rushmore, the rustic mountain scenery of Horse Thief Lake exists in an area  where there is so much to explore, it’s hard to know where to begin! The abundance of family fun available here starts with open roads, preserved nature, world-famous roadside attractions, historic landmarks and so much more. The Black Hills of South Dakota provides the back drop for family memories that will be monumental in the memory books. The best place to begin this top summer destination is at travelsouthdakota.com.
  9. knoxville tnKnoxville, TN  On the banks of the Tennessee River and in the foothills of the Smoky Mountains is one of the country’s perfect summer destinations. As a neighbor to America’s most visited national park, the area offers much to see and do for all ages for as many days or weeks as are available. Here lies a quirky combination of art, music, science, nature, sports, and history that comes together for entertainment opportunity like no other. Museums, historical treasures, and attractions of all kinds make up a list that is hard to pare down when looking at the things to do list of the area. Water sports include everything from serene to extreme on the river that is so much a part of the region. To experience Knoxville, go to tnvacation.com and start making plans.
  10. tybee islandTybee Island, GA  Less than 20 miles from historic Savannah, GA, lies Tybee Island known as Savannah Beach. An area rich in history and natural beauty, Tybee Island really does have something to offer for everyone of all ages. Exploring the island’s beach, salty marsh, and beautiful southeastern coastline is an amazing combination of nature that provides a backdrop that is best known for birdwatching. The usual opportunities for watersports exist as well as historical points of interest but all come together with a twist of Southern charm not available anywhere else in the country. To put Tybee Island on your summer travel schedule, start out at tybeeisland.com.

Kimberly Travaglino, Fulltime Families founder, and Mary Beth Goff, creator of Road Trip Teacher, come together as the Roadschool Moms© team with one of the top educational podcasts available on iTunes. Roadschool Moms airs LIVE every Sunday night at 9 pm EST on the Ultimate Homeschool Radio Network. For more details on Roadschool Moms Top 10 Summer Destinations, check out the July 5th episode.

All About Flag Day

  • Jun 14, 2015

Flag Day CoverOne day, the Roadschool 101 crew will get to achieve one of their leap list goals by spending the weeks between Flag Day and July 4th on the east coast in the midst of historical adventures – Colonial Williamsburg to Washington DC. Until then, we just keep the yearning for learning going with quick pit-stops in learning such as the Flag Day quick-top guide released earlier this week. This simple explanation for the American holiday to observe the nation’s flag includes print copywork for The Star-Spangled Banner as well as a few prompts for roadschoolers who might want to follow a rabbit trail to learning more about the flag and how this holiday came to be. For a more in-depth study of America’s birthday, check out The Patriot’s Guide to July 4th. Happy 238th Birthday to the American Flag!

Activities You’ll Miss by Taking Your Family on the Road

  • Mar 9, 2015

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Taking your kiddos out of the public or private school system and entering the homeschool arena is a big transition. More times than not, extra-curricular sports are not affected. As a matter of fact, homeschoolers can actually make more time for added activities, if desired, because of a more flexible schedule. But what happens when you take your family on the road? Worried about all the things you’ll miss by embarking on this full-time adventure in America’s backyard? Well here’s the take on the subject from the Roadschool 101 crew.

Participating in team sports or being involved in club activities that require being in one location is often a sacrifice for a family that travels full-time. While making friends and learning commitment values are a major advantage to this scenario, such activities usually also come with a rigorous practice and performance schedule. Being on the road, delivers a brand new abundance of family time that can be divided up as little or as much as desired. And, making friends and learning commitment values can still be achieved along with a multitude of other character-building ideals.

If your roadschooler already has a passion for a certain sport, you can usually achieve making it part of your life but it will require a bit more effort for all parties. We’ve found that if we are stationary for any length of time, even for several weeks, this time period can lead to participation in activities offered through city parks and recreation departments. There are many chapters of the YMCA across the country that offer classes and even camps or workshops for different areas of interest. Many times, contacting homeschool groups in an area can lead to resources geared towards a homeschooling schedule will can provide the flexibility a traveling schedule also calls for.

Being in different areas during seasonal times of the year can also create unique opportunities for the roadschool experience. For instance, my boys received the benefits from a pitching workshop and a batting camp not far from a baseball spring training facility in SouthWest Florida. Other season training camps exist all over the country at different times of the year depending on the sport. Many sports can be enjoyed from a solo role and pursued from the road such as gymnastics, dance, dirt bike or ATV racing, or skateboarding.

Being on the road and away from the norm can provide unique other exclusive learning connections such as

  • Fencing  – a timeless activity that develops problem solving skills
  • Cooking – a great way to mold a child culinarian that often leads to a zest for healthy food
  • Golf – a  game that instills patience, good manners, and the knowledge that practice makes progress
  • Lego League – an organization that teaches the basics of robotics along with teamwork and good sportmanship
  • Music – a whole new area of interest where the sky is the limit once the basics of reading music is learned

Although being on the road may produce a list of sacrifices, our crew believes that the advantages far outweigh the disadvantages. While we miss participating in previous team sports with old friends, we are grateful for so many experiences with a circle of new friends that has grown with each and every mile of this new journey. Our lifestyle has expanded the horizons and the passion for different interests of all ages aboard our rig and we wouldn’t have it any other way.

This post was written as a springboard for the Roadschool Moms podcast produced on March 8th “What You’ll Miss If You Take Your Family On The Road” available on iTunes and broadcast by the Ultimate Homeschool Radio Network.

ABCs of Choosing Roadschool Curriculum

  • Oct 26, 2014

2014 10 26 Show Button

ACCEPT the fact that you cannot create the perfect curriculum plan. What works for one student will not work for another. What works one year may not work the next. Sometimes, you have to take the lesser of two evils and make the best of a situation. Roadschooling is a constant evolution of different styles of learning in different locations. And THAT is what makes it uniquely amazing!

BLEND independent and teacher-led curriculum. This will create time in your roadschool day for one-on-one with one student while another works on his own.

CONSIDER your child’s learning style. If she hates to read on an electronic device then chances are her curriculum shouldn’t be solely computer based. Workbooks or textbooks might be the way to go for part of the day-to-day studies.

The best piece of advice from the Roadschool Moms team is to relax and enjoy your roadschool. Many times, both of us have found that when we let one of our kiddos take the lead in the learning adventure on the road, the roadschool magic happens on its own. Sometimes, it’s a rabbit trail to learning something new. Other times, it’s a whole new way of learning. And many times, it’s an education built on the foundation of the basics that is already learned.

Recognize the subjects that might be taught across all age groups in your household (if you have more than one roadschooler.) For example, Apologia has different levels of workbook journals for the same subject science notebook. Some reading projects can be enjoyed by all ages in your rig. Finding at least one area of your roadschool lesson plan that can be enjoyed by all will not only be time-effective but will create family unity while allowing older siblings to mentor younger ones in the group.

To hear more about the roadschool curriculum choices that the Roadschool Moms have in place in their rigs, tune in this Sunday night at 9 pm EST at www.RoadschoolMoms.com hosted by the Ultimate Homeschool Radio Network or listen to the podcast available on iTunes.

Kimberly Travaglino (Fulltime Families) and Mary Beth Goff (Road Trip Teacher) make up the Roadschool Moms team that bring a live, one-hour weekly broadcast to the Ultimate Homeschool Radio Network that is dedicated to the needs and challenges facing today’s roadschool moms. The show offers listeners a fresh take on homeschooling while traveling full time. The duo showcase current events and feature a mix of expert guests. The Roadschool Moms invite listeners to participate in what the show calls “rolling conversation” both on-air and online.

 

Roadschool 101: Memorizing Multiplication Facts

  • Sep 23, 2014

Multiplication Copywork Cover Only

It may be a bit old-school but the Road Trip Teacher is a fan of memorizing math facts, specifically multiplication (times) tables. In our rig, we have tackled this task over the past few weeks and are excited to say that practice makes progress! Check out the detailed process for memorizing 0-12 times tables from Diary of a Road Mom.  Although we have used all brands and kinds of flash cards, we absolutely love Edupress’ Math in a Flash multiplication flash cards.

math in a flash

The free printable to track your learner’s success is now available in our Learning Shop. This printable turned the memorization process into a bit of a competition for the Roadschool 101 crew. As the times tables facts are memorized, a sticker or other visual symbol of success is placed in the appropriate section. Once the grid of the printable is complete, the student is considered a Multiplication Master. 

This week, Road Trip Teacher released the newest addition to the copywork guide series: Multiplication Facts 0-12 Copywork. This all-inclusive guide is designed to help your roadschooler memorize the 0-12 times tables by using three (3) styles of copy work pages, a rainbow multiplication chart, and two (2) different printables for encouragement during the process of learning this important math operation. The 60-page copywork guide is recommended for grades 3-5 but will work for any age. For a limited time, join the Road Trip Teacher mailing list and receive this Multiplication Facts 0-12 Copywork product for just $2! E-mail info@roadtripteacher.com with “Add Me” as the subject line and you’ll receive a special coupon to take advantage of this special offer.

7 Ways to Encourage Reluctant Readers

  • Aug 31, 2014

RoadschoolMoms_stampReluctant readers come in all shapes and sizes. Many reluctant readers are very intelligent children who are simply not interested in reading. Sometimes, those children have just not come across the right reading material suited for them.  The road to finding motivation for a reluctant reader is usually a long, bumpy one; however, finding the best inspiration along the journey is also one of the most satisfying.  The Road Trip Teacher uses these 7 ways to help the reluctant reader aboard the Roadschool 101 Crew find his way to reading success:

Audio Books. Encourage your children to enjoy listening to stories through audio books. Downloading MP3 files to play while on the road is a great way for them to steer away from the boredom of travel days. Audio books can be listened to while doing outside or other activities so that reluctant readers learn to appreciate a good book while not having to focus on reading the words at hand. As the interest in this type of reading grows, encouraging a reluctant reader to hear the audio book while reading the text of the book will naturally improve reading fluency, comprehension, and vocabulary skills. Over time, audio books can turn kiddos into avid page-turners.

Read Aloud. Make a family reading session a regular part of your daily or bedtime routine. Before beginning the book, talk about the title, the author and the illustrator. It’s important for children to become familiar with what these three things mean. Let each member of the family read as little or as much as desired and record the success on a Family Reading Log. Between readers, encourage everyone to make predictions as to what they think might happen next in the story. Take advantage of any pictures in the book by sharing them for all to see. Move your finger underneath the words as you read for the younger readers that may be sitting beside you or or your lap. Be sure to ask questions as you progress through the story and give everyone a chance to weigh in on any words that are not understood.

Read Everywhere. It is no secret that a high percentage of reluctant readers are boys. Finding the way to your reluctant readers happy ending is with lots of patience, creativity, and positive reinforcement. Reading billboards, perusing fascinating facts at the zoo or museum, or reading the ingredients on the side of grocery items when shopping are all ways to invite learners into the reality of reading every day. Some kids just aren’t cut out to sit and read page after page of information. Such reading skills can be developed over time at a child’s own pace. In the meantime, keeping other forms of reading in a student’s daily diet is important to developing proficiency.

Themed Books. Whether it’s a basket in your rig or a bag beside the bed, collect reading materials that go with the season or holiday that is occurring. Many times, the excitement of the time of year can spill over and grow readers out of reading favorite books over and over again. Because these books are only available for a short time, children look forward to reading fresh stories from an old book tradition.

Reading Rewards. Learning to read and increasing reading levels is a journey. What better way to encourage the progress of this journey by rewarding the pit stops along the way. Reading rewards can be found in many forms such as

  • Time for other activities (screen time, video game time, etc.)
  • Physical items (a compass because reading takes your places or a fun bouncy ball since reading is a ball!)
  • Reading logs (sometimes competition is good and the accomplishment of being the first to read so many minutes/books is all it takes)

Reading Games. There is no shortage of reading apps available out there and finding favorites is easy too. However, many games require reading as part of the process so take advantage of providing a fun activity with educational results. A simple solution to reading games is as easy as giving your learners a few old magazines and a sight word scavenger hunt printable so that he or she can cut the words out and paste them to the sheet. Perhaps the first one done gets a hand full of gummy worms that serve as prized bookworms!

Cozy Reading Areas. No matter what your location, cozy reading areas can be cultivated. A comfy bean bag chair under a good lamp in the corner of your rig can suffice. However, a crook in a shade tree or a towel under an umbrella on the beach can also provide the perfect spot for a comfy afternoon of reading in the great outdoors. Keeping a reluctant reader interested is a big part of the challenge. Letting him or her create their own reading nook in nature might just be the ticket to finding the inspiration to read more pages.

Whatever the way to your reluctant readers heart, keep it light without putting so much pressure on the student or yourself. Sometimes, it takes weeks or even months for something to click. Until then, try different methods and try them often until a different day down the road when reading isn’t on the chore list.

bookworm-iconMary Beth Goff, author/creator of Road Trip Teacher, LLC, is a homeschooling, traveling roadmom of four kids whose love of learning is taking them places they never knew existed while along the journey of a lifetime! Learn more from Diary of a Road Mom or Road Trip Teacher. The Road Trip Teacher is also part of the Roadschool Moms radio team that airs every Sunday night LIVE on the Ultimate Homeschool Radio Network.

 

7 Ways to Make July 4th a Blast

  • Jun 30, 2014

July 4th is a favorite holiday among our crew. Traditionally, we’ve always centered the holiday around a cook-out of some sort, family festivities, and fireworks. Since we’ve been on the road, where we watch July 4th fireworks has became part of the leap list of places we hope to visit some day. I’ve found that it doesn’t take a lot of money or energy to go from zero to hero on the Mom-o-meter for this Independence Celebration with these 7 quick and easy ways to make July 4th a blast!

special things

First of all, I purchase a small inventory of themed items in the week or so before the holiday. Red or blue plastic cups and plates can be found at anytime during the year so those are easy finds. I picked up the patriotic centerpiece at a Meijer store for $1.99. Not only did it jazz up the table but I snipped off some of the wire strands to use in the fruit rockets below. Sugars, sprinkles, marshmallows, special napkins, and glitter ribbon helped to round out the Roadschool 101 crew’s celebration of the Red, White, & Blue. The few things I picked up were about $12.

cookies

A family favorite in our rig are these festive chocolate chip cookies sandwiches. Whether made by scratch or purchased already baked, it’s a snap to put these cookies together. Chocolate chip cookies (mini-sized are the best), a can of your favorite-brand icing, and holiday sprinkles are all you need. Be sure to put a heavier layer of icing towards the outside of the cookie before putting them together and pressing down so that just a bit of icing creeps outside the edges as this what makes the sprinkles stick to the sides of the cookie sandwiches.

toast

No patriot’s breakfast would be complete without flag-themed toast. A piece of toast, strawberry jam, a few slices of banana, and a handful of blueberries is all that’s required. This is a great time to talk a bit about Betsy Ross and the creation of the American flag for a little roadschool in the morning.

Watermelon Stars over Blueberries2

Blueberries and watermelon are a favorite in our rig. The watermelon stars are a cinch to make with a star-shaped cookie cutter. I have no problem getting a pint-sized volunteer to make them so they can be added to a bowl of fresh blueberries. It’s a fun and festive addition to any meal of the day.

yogurt

Another breakfast favorite for our family is yogurt parfaits. Keeping with the red, white, and blue theme is no problem with a handfull of blueberries and strawberries. Aside from the fruit, plain granola, vanilla yogurt, and a clear glass of some sort is all that’s needed. Layer the granola, yogurt, strawberries, more granola, yogurt, and blueberries and voila’, this super special treat is complete. My gang gobbles this up in no time.

strawberries

Making these chocolate-dipped strawberries is as fun as eating them. Ripe whole strawberries, white chocolate candy coating, and blue sugar are used to make these in less than 15 minutes. Melt the candy coating in the microwave or over the stove. Dip the whole berries into the coating and allow to set up on wax paper. After 1-2 minutes, dip just the bottom of the berries in sugar. A plateful of these delectable delights can serve as a centerpiece to any July 4th table.

rocket kabobs

Before sending the kiddos out to play, send up the fruit rockets and sit back to watch the fun. Boys and girls alike will enjoy this spin on a fruit kabob loaded with strawberries, blueberries, and star marshmallows. Of course, any kind of fruit can be used. Tying a ribbon or other decoration to the end of the wooden skewer is a cinch and tops off the authentic rocket model.

Cover PRINT July 4th Study Guide

Plans for this year’s July 4th holiday are well underway. We’ll enjoy many of these fun foods in the days leading up to America’s birthday. The Roadschool 101 just completed their July 4th Copywork and Study Guide so each is armed with all the facts of this All-American holiday. For your free-copy of the Road Trip Teacher exclusive (a $5 value), e-mail info@roadtripteacher.com and tell us why you’re proud to be an American. Happy 4th of July from Road Trip Teacher and the Roadschool 101 Crew!

8 Great Destinations to Watch July 4th Fireworks

  • Jun 24, 2014
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The first Independence Day fireworks celebration reportedly took place in Philadelphia on July 4th, 1777, on the first anniversary of America’s birthday. Although this pyrotechnic pastime has became common for many other holidays and special events, there’s still something extra-special about July 4th fireworks. The Road Trip Teacher crew has these 8 great destinations on their leap list for places to celebrate the country’s independence.
  • Under the Gateway Arch in St. Louis, MO
  • At Navy Pier over Lake Michigan in Chicago, IL
  • Over the Mississippi River in New Orleans, LA
  • From the beach at Lake Tahoe, CA
  • Above the Charles River at the Boston Pops Spectacular in Boston, MA
  • Along the Hudson River in New York City, NY
  • At the Lincoln Memorial in Washington DC
  • Beside Boathouse Row in Philadelphia, PA
For more details on how fireworks became part of the traditional July celebration at America’s biggest birthday party, download the Road Trip Teacher’s Patriot’s Guide to July 4th.  Subscribe to America’s #1 Destination Resource to see where the Roadschool 101 crew watches this year’s illuminations in the dark sky on the Fourth.

Cursive Copywork Edition Released for ABCs of America’s National Parks Guide

  • Jun 14, 2014

ABCs Cover Cursive

After many requests for a cursive edition of the recently released ABCs of America’s National Parks product, Road Trip Teacher has released the first in a series of cursive copywork guides this week. The ABCs of America’s National Parks is designed to help your roadschooler practice cursive handwriting skills while writing facts about America’s national parks that take him or her through 26 key facts from A to Z. A short history of the National Park Service is also covered to introduce the government agency that maintains the 84 million acres of national park land in the United States. A short list of vocabulary words are included with the guide for spelling practice as well as a clear definition of words commonly associated with national park facts. Word puzzles are also included along with answer keys.

The Roadschool 101 crew uses copywork in many subjects to:

  • Practice penmanship
  • Reinforce facts and ideas while learning
  • Improves spelling
  • Expands vocabulary
  • Teaches language structure and style
  • Refines grammar skills
  • Enhances memorization of simple facts

We printed the pages of The ABCs of America’s National Parks copywork guide and bound it together in a booklet. The book will be used in two ways for each of our roadschoolers. By dating the collection of handwriting, it will be kept with other such projects as a record of each student’s work. It’s fun to compare handwriting progress and can be reviewed for years to come. It is also used as reference material for future projects. The pages of the handwritten guide gives each roadschooler the freedom to learn what is interesting to him or her and enjoy the pursuit of knowledge. For example, someone in our rig was intrigued with the fact that Olympic marmots only live in one place in the whole wide world! An entire week was spent by that learner exploring the animal’s facts, the ecosystem it lives in, and the national park that it calls home.

The ABCs of America’s National Parks is available in a cursive edition as well as a print edition. A combination pack can be downloaded for both sets of copy work for roadschoolers who need both. Free sample pages can be viewed in the Learning Shop.  The cursive version is recommended for grades 4-6, the print version is recommended for grades 1-3, and either guide can be used for all ages.

Copywork Guide Released for America’s National Parks

  • Jun 13, 2014

ABCs CoverRoad Trip Teacher has released the first in a series of copywork guides this week. The ABCs of America’s National Parks is designed to help your roadschooler practice handwriting skills while writing facts about America’s national parks that take him or her through 26 key facts from A to Z. A short history of the National Park Service is also covered to introduce the government agency that maintains the 84 million acres of national park land in the United States. A short list of vocabulary words are included with the guide for spelling practice as well as a clear definition of words commonly associated with national park facts. Word puzzles are also included along with answer keys.

The Roadschool 101 crew uses copywork in many subjects to:

  • Practice penmanship
  • Reinforce facts and ideas while learning
  • Improves spelling
  • Expands vocabulary
  • Teaches language structure and style
  • Refines grammar skills
  • Enhances memorization of simple facts

We printed the pages of The ABCs of America’s National Parks copywork guide and bound it together in a booklet. The book will be used in two ways for each of our roadschoolers. By dating the collection of handwriting, it will be kept with other such projects as a record of each student’s work. It’s fun to compare handwriting progress and can be reviewed for years to come. It is also used as reference material for future projects. The pages of the handwritten guide gives each roadschooler the freedom to learn what is interesting to him or her and enjoy the pursuit of knowledge. For example, someone in our rig was intrigued with the fact that Olympic marmots only live in one place in the whole wide world! An entire week was spent by that learner exploring the animal’s facts, the ecosystem it lives in, and the national park that it calls home.

The ABCs of America’s National Parks is available in a manuscript edition as well as a cursive edition. A combination pack can be downloaded for both sets of copywork. Free sample pages can be viewed in the Learning Shop.  The manuscript version is recommended for grades 1-3, the cursive version is recommended for grades 4-6, and either guide can be used for all ages.

 

 

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